Horse 'Whispering'

"The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way
its animals are treated" - Gandhi
linn
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 461
Joined: 25 Dec 2003, 09:58
Location: North America

Horse 'Whispering'

Postby linn » 26 Dec 2003, 22:19

A few of the people I know from RMN are aware of the way much of my 'real' life is focused on horse rescue -- to save abused and/or neglected horses from the horrible circumstances humans inflict upon them, including going to slaughter. If there's an interest here, I'll go into detail about this, otherwise I'll stick to the positive stuff.

Last summer, neighbors told me about a yearling colt who'd suffered a bad injury to his left shoulder and was dragging his left front leg. The owner's vet said it was a radial nerve injury, and the colt should be put down if he didn't recover within two weeks. I couldn't believe this when I heard it -- my perspective was everybody knows radial nerve takes 2-3 months, not weeks, and what the heck was this vet thinking? So, I told my neighbors to ask the colt's owner to drop him off at my place instead of having him put down.

Had my vet do an exam on the colt the day he arrived. Very bad news -- my vet thought the colt had a fracture of the humerus, and he advised me to either 1) take the colt to the horse clinic at the local university; or 2) have him put down. My vet did say the colt didn't appear to be in any bad pain or distress, and if I wanted to give it a week or two, it probably wouldn't hurt anything.

A week before, two other yearling colts had been dropped off at our place -- these two were half-starved and beaten-up from being turned-out with adult horses, so I thought the three of them would do well together. And they did -- it was so great to observe them together. They were all so happy to just be able to eat in peace-and-quiet, and not have anybody picking on them.

August passed into September, and Apache, the colt who was dragging his left front leg, continued to do so. I was supplementing his feed with everything I could think of, and could see that he was making a little progress. Meanwhile, his other front leg was becoming increasingly stressed from carrying all the weight for both front legs, and I was getting worried. What if his right front leg broke down before his left leg recovered?

By early October, I was losing faith -- had been praying for a miracle every day, didn't know what else to do. And then, I remembered the way Lawgiver1 [Gnosty on this forum] had horses many years ago, and something told me to ask him for advice. It was an act of pure desperation -- I didn't know that he knew as much about horses as he does, but it made all the difference.

To be continued ...

linn
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 461
Joined: 25 Dec 2003, 09:58
Location: North America

Horse 'Whispering' con't

Postby linn » 27 Dec 2003, 21:54

Gnosty wrote back with a lot of great advice, told me about a wonderful supplement called Equion, see:

http://www.enzion.com/Enzion/horse/equion/index.html

He also told me about a calming/healing technique he used on all his horses. When I first began using it, I didn't know it was horse 'whispering' -- Gnosty didn't clue me in about that until later! In the meantime, I was absolutely stunned by the way Apache responded to it. Within several days, he was actually standing on his left front leg, which took a lot of the stress off the right leg. By mid-October, he was walking, yes, with a limp, but he was walking. And then one day, he trotted across his paddock. Fortunately, I had witnesses, otherwise I'm not sure anybody would've believed it.

When I wrote to tell Gnosty about all this, I told him I thought that the supplement he'd recommended had been very helpful, but in my mind, what really made the difference was the healing technique. That's when he told me it was horse 'whispering', and he asked me to teach others how to do this whenever I had the opportunity. At the time, I mentioned a 16-year-old neighbor girl who has an amazing gift for horses, and that when the time was right I'd see if she was open to it.

Apache went home in early November, and continues to recover. I anticipate he'll be completely sound and ready for training in the spring.

On Wednesday, Jodi, the 16-year-old neighbor girl, stopped by to give me a Christmas present. I'd told her about Equion and some of the other supplements I use for joint problems when her two-year-old filly Gemini blew out one of her knees in October. Gemini had made a lot of progress, but Jodi said she'd lost ground in the last week or so -- was having trouble getting her hindquarters up in the mornings, had lost weight despite having a good appetite. Gemini was the smaller of a pair of twins, and I think her surviving as long as she has indicates she has a powerful will to live. Jodi was going to be busy with family Christmas celebrations, so I told her I'd stop by on Friday to see how Gemini was doing. When she left, she asked me to not open her present until Christmas Day.

When I did, it was a video tape of "The Horse Whisperer".

Friday morning, Jodi showed up on my doorstep with tears in her eyes. She and her mother had had to help Gemini get up that morning. I told her I wanted to try something that might seem a little weird, but she'd just have to trust me. Showed her how to do the technique, and asked her to do it at least once a day.

Jodi stopped by today to tell me Gemini got up on her own this morning, and was frisking around a little in her paddock for the first time in a couple of weeks.

Angelica
Guest

Postby Angelica » 28 Dec 2003, 00:50

Such a lovely healing story! Gnosty shows amazing healing abilities with animals and people! We're not "horse people," but I do love them and find them very special and noble creatures.

Thank you for writing and sharing in this way. :clap:

I was Laurel on the TW board! I remember you, Linn! Good to see you here!!!

Angelica

linn
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 461
Joined: 25 Dec 2003, 09:58
Location: North America

Postby linn » 28 Dec 2003, 13:11

Good to see you here, too :grin:

fortunlady
Guest

Horse "Whispering"

Postby fortunlady » 17 Jan 2004, 01:04

I am extremely interested in any information you can share about Horse
Whispering.
My daughter & I started an equine rescue & rehabilitation program in 1999.
Due to lack of funding and no employment opportunity locally, Karelyn was
forced to relocate, the rescue operation is closed. I currently care for five, three of the ten we rescued and two three year olds born here!
Dan is a 24 year old gelding Belgian/Quarter Horse (intercepted before the "kill buyer" arrived) has hoof problems, is retired and enjoys ruling over ... Minnie 6 year old mare Quarter Horse/ Newfoundland Pony (going to the "kill buyer" @ 2 yrs), Luna Mana born to Minnie just ten months after we rescued her, beautiful large pony suspected sire Newfoundland Pony, then there's Kula a petite, beautiful Newfoundland Pony/Morgan
born here and the last rescued .. Dusty Lane Kara 7 year old Standardbred was a star on the track for a short time, then discarded worked as a trail horse for a summer (intercepted before the "kill buyer" arrived) Kara was in terrible shape physically & emotionally when she arrived two years ago, she now looks wonderful but has behavior problems (lowly in the herd, last one to arrive) while in her stall she is very distructive, kicking, raring
and cribbing! Karelyn was the horse woman, loves them had college equine training and natural ability, now I am alone with this beautiful herd I love and care for each of them by myself, could use lots of advice!!!!!!
Luna & Kula show basic good manners but will need further training, Kara is my major concern, how can I help her????

Sally

Paulo
Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Posts: 326
Joined: 31 Dec 2003, 15:53
Location: North America

Postby Paulo » 17 Jan 2004, 02:16

Hi fortunelady. I remember a few years back, when I decided to buy my six year old niece, recently told she had diabetes, a horse. We went to the "horse country" and I saw this beautiful spunky mustang. The owner told us that he was severely abused. And surely he was, but my little niece (Jenelle), learned to groom and love the horse enough to get over her newfound condition. As time passed she traded the horse (I do not recall his name), for another one named "Dopie." Dopie was totally different.

Unfortunately, I only got to share little time with the mustang (going thru my own problems), but his ways were sure a learning experience for me.
I got to ride with him many times enough to understand each other under very straineous conditions :roll:

There is not much I can offer you as far as knowledge with these beautiful beasts, but may you receive the help needed to pull thru.

Gnosty
Forum Administrator
Forum Administrator
Posts: 551
Joined: 25 Nov 2003, 20:20
Location: Ecuador
Contact:

Postby Gnosty » 17 Jan 2004, 10:44

True "horse whispering" has absolutely nothing to do with the Hollywood trash version or what is found in a multitude of current books on the subject. Authentic horse whispering is founded from Native American tribes who spiritually 'tuned in' to the earth and all creatures, especially their horses. It is also founded from the Bedouin Tribes of North Africa and the Middle East. When your horse sleeps with you in your tent, it's obvious he's not just a mount to ride to the oasis for water!

What I discussed with linn_ciesla was what I learned from both Native Americans and from a north African working at the Valuante Stables in Spain. It's a "hands-on" and spoken communication with animals that never fails, regardless of what language you speak. There's no psychic or mystical 'New Age' garbage involved, as the latest books talk about.

It all boils down to the fact that every animal was created for humanity, but it's a responsible two-way street on our part. An animal will respect you if you learn to respect him for his true nature. Mankind has imprisoned animals so that they have learned to mistrust us. The only way to break that is to show the animal that you can be trusted. That's where the 'hands-on' communication begins.

Have you ever been touched by another human, such as on your shoulder, and felt an emotion from that touch? Do you think animals are any different?! How many of you like your neck lightly massaged? Did you ever try touching an animal the same way? Mankind has a remarkable and inherant healing power through the use of our hands, but this is rarely applied to animals let alone other human beings.

When you combine hands-on touching with a proper tone from your voice, animals respond according to where you touch them and the sounds coming from your mouth. Mothers instinctively hum to their babies without being taught to do so. Mares nicker to their foals the same way, as do all animals. Why not learn from nature rather than try to strong-arm animals into submission?

Our hands and voices are extremely powerful, and when we apply that to animals, the results are powerful when done properly. True horse whispering is just that. You can't communicate trust with a horse using spurs and whips. Horses understand freedom more than humanity does, so why is it any wonder that a "problem" horse with "bad behavior" such as kicking or destructive cribbing is merely reacting to previous fears and abuse?

We have a responsibility to live with the creatures created for us, not to rule over them like tyrants. Unless we communicate with them properly through sound and touch, they will continue to react as caged prisoners. It's up to us to break their fears the right way. Our words have creative power, as do our touches. Using them wisely is a wisdom that comes from within, not from a book or watching a Hollywood movie.
Only the harmonics of the LifeCross will bring Living Light to humanity - Michael Edward

fortunlady
Guest

horse whispering

Postby fortunlady » 17 Jan 2004, 14:04

Thank you Gnosty for your wise advice. I shall be more consistent with the hands on approach and will add some soothing vocal tones.

Sally

Paulo
Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Posts: 326
Joined: 31 Dec 2003, 15:53
Location: North America

Postby Paulo » 17 Jan 2004, 14:47

Yes Gnosty,
I remember the little time I spent with the "abused" horse, that I would massage his neck and groom him etc., all the while constantly talking to him using a soft loving tone, for I sure felt the past rejection of this love. Then after I placed the saddle on him, I would continue, on to the riding together, dismounting and walking together and so on...
Sometimes holding on to dear life, but would continue.

I remember my little niece doing the same during her daily visits to him. Her soft young talks with him. She never did get as far as riding with him, too much, but whatever relationship she had with the horse was surely a kind one. As long as she was on her own two feet, the horse was alright.

linn
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 461
Joined: 25 Dec 2003, 09:58
Location: North America

GREAT news about Apache!!!

Postby linn » 19 Jan 2004, 21:21

Apache's doing so well that his owners have trained him to drive, and he's been pulling their sleigh for several miles at a time! Nobody who saw how bad off he was last fall can quite believe it, but he's made a full recovery -- months before even I was expecting it.

A clarification -- my mention of "The Horse Whisperer" in a previous post was not meant as an endorsement of the movie, a lot of which I consider downright silly. I merely took Jodi's giving it to me for Christmas as a sign that she was ready to learn how to 'whisper'.

Am in the process of putting up a site about our horses, and the programs we're establishing to work toward making our rescue self-supporting. Will post here with the URL when it's finished :smile:

kate
Guest

adopt a horse

Postby kate » 24 Jan 2004, 23:45

FYI

From Whitley Striebers Unknown country
Adopt an HRT Horse
24-Jan-2004

We recently reported that thousands of the specially kept pregnant mares that produce the urine used for human hormone replacement therapy are being slaughtered for horsemeat, now that millions of women are going off HRT. Many extra foals will be slaughtered as well—but you can help by adopting one of these horses.

Click here for adoption information.

Gnosty
Forum Administrator
Forum Administrator
Posts: 551
Joined: 25 Nov 2003, 20:20
Location: Ecuador
Contact:

Re: GREAT news about Apache!!!

Postby Gnosty » 10 Jun 2004, 14:49

Am in the process of putting up a site about our horses, and the programs we're establishing to work toward making our rescue self-supporting. Will post here with the URL when it's finished :smile:
Linn's Horse Rescue site is now online at: http://www.windofheaven.com/index.html
Only the harmonics of the LifeCross will bring Living Light to humanity - Michael Edward

linn
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 461
Joined: 25 Dec 2003, 09:58
Location: North America

Horse Racing's Dirty Little Secret

Postby linn » 10 Jun 2004, 23:16

'Washed Up' Thoroughbreds Often Land At Slaughterhouse
Horse Racing's Dirty Little Secret
By Rick Maese
The Orlando Sentinel
5-28-04

NEW HOLLAND, Pa. (KRT) - Inside, dozens of horses line the stalls with just a shade of wiggle room. Fanciful names only get a thoroughbred so far in horse racing. By the time a horse gets here - the weekly New Holland Sales Stable horse auction - each is reduced to a number.

The tag on one hip reads No. 154. No one knows that the gelding once was known as Five Star General. Bred six years ago by a former Kentucky governor, Five Star General last raced in July 2003 and earned $26,000 in his career.

They'll never learn that here.

"$125! $125!" says the auctioneer in the small wooden booth, rolling many words into one. "Can I get one-and-a-quarter? One-and-a-quarter, one-a-quarter, one-a-quarter?"

Five Star General will be sold on this day and shoved into a pen with two dozen other horses. Then he'll be loaded into a trailer and shipped 1,500 miles to a small plant just outside Fort Worth, Texas.

He will be slaughtered there, racing dreams packaged and shipped overseas. His processed remains will be exported to Belgium or France, where the meat will be prepared in a kitchen.

This is horse racing's dirty little secret - the one those in the industry traditionally have ignored and outsiders barely hear about.

In recent years, the fates of two decorated racers became public. Exceller was an English champion more than 25 years ago, winning 15 of 33 starts - $1.6 million in purse money. He even defeated legends such as Seattle Slew and Affirmed. In 1997, Exceller was killed in a Swedish slaughterhouse, becoming one of the sport's first martyrs.

Ferdinand won the 1986 Kentucky Derby and was retired to stud. He was sold from a Kentucky farm in 1995 to a Japanese farm. He didn't produce much and was sold to a dealer in 2002. News surfaced last year that Ferdinand was slaughtered in late 2002.

Those are the two names that people know. There are thousands of other racehorses that have met a similar fate. Thoroughbreds that don't cut it at the track have to go somewhere, and the last stop isn't always a grassy meadow. Sometimes it's a dinner plate.

The slaughter-for-human-consumption controversy has divided the horse-racing industry. For years, it simply ignored the issue, but lately, as Congress and courts have dug their hands into the exposed secret, horse owners, trainers and breeders have come down on one side or the other.

Nearly 50,000 horses were slaughtered and sold overseas for human consumption in 2003, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture figures. An additional 30,000 were shipped to Canada, where they were slaughtered, and 1,000 were sent to Mexico.

It generally is accepted in the horse industry that about 10 percent of the slaughtered horses are thoroughbreds, the sleek and powerful breed usually foaled specifically to race. For comparison, the Jockey Club, the breed registry for thoroughbreds in North America, annually registers about 33,000 new foals.

Somewhat surprisingly, groups such as the American Horse Council, the Jockey Club and the American Veterinarians Association have issued statements against a legislative bill that would ban horse slaughter for human consumption.

They generally contend that it's necessary in the horse industry, and the alternative is a surplus of unwanted horses.

In addition to the House bill, others actively are campaigning to banish horse slaughter in the United States. A decision in the Texas Supreme Court is expected in the coming weeks that will determine whether the country's two remaining plants can continue operation legally. And in Illinois, local communities are fighting to stop a new plant from opening its doors this month.

"We don't think it's right," says Rep. John Sweeney, R-N.Y. "It's a process cloaked in covert darkness."

Horsemeat is a delicacy in some parts of northern France, southern Belgium, Holland, Italy and Japan. Though there are horses in Europe, menus specifically advertise "American horsemeat," as though horses here are bred for flavor. It is also easier and cheaper to raise a horse to maturity in the United States than much of Europe.

Horsemeat tastes like beef, with a fine, gamelike texture and is lower in fat and cholesterol. It is legal to eat horse in the United States, except in the few states that have specific laws that say otherwise, such as California, Texas and Illinois.

Though the number of horses slaughtered has risen in the past two years, it has dropped dramatically since 1990. The issue has boiled into a controversy, slowly growing from muted whisper at the track to a debate that has split horse owners into two factions.

"It's a touchy subject," says Richard Hancock, the executive vice president of the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders and Owners Association. "People come from a lot of different points of view.

"While it's offensive and repulsive for me to think about eating a horse, in Europe and other countries, they have a different viewpoint. It just depends on how you're raised. We've probably got as wide a view within our industry as any other issue."

Officials with the weekly auction in New Holland, Pa., don't welcome the attention, but the horse-slaughter issue is perhaps most extant here.

This is where fates are sealed.

Every Monday afternoon in this small town - mostly sprawling farmland in the middle of Amish country - families come to buy a pet for their children, Amish farmers buy horses to pull their plows, ranchers look for horses to work. And horse dealers show up looking to scrape the bottom of the barrel, taking the horse industry's castoffs.

About 200 horses are pulled out of the cramped stalls on either side of the auditorium area. Each horse is walked or ridden down a narrow dirt runway, put on display for the group in attendance.

The building is like a giant shed. The stench is only made worse by the heat, which barely is affected by the old fans slowly spinning high above.

The auctioneer isn't polished and usually can tell you only the age of a horse and its tag number. But the price tag is usually cheap. Although many horse auctions have minimum bids (at the Ocala Breeders Sale, it's $1,000), here most horses sell for a few hundred dollars.

A horse is escorted down the runway, and as the auctioneer begins calling out numbers in rapid-fire succession, an Amish man in the narrow pen watches for bids. He has a thick beard but no moustache; a white straw hat, black pants and suspenders that climb over his shoulders.

Once the bidding nears $500, the Amish man becomes more animated as he tells the auctioneer a new bid has come in.

"Hey-yeah!" he shouts, punching the air like a home-plate umpire.

Parked outside are trucks, horse-drawn buggies and long trailers. The 200 people gathered on wooden bleachers inside are just as eclectic. Aging farmers sit next to young women. Old Amish men play checkers in a small room near the entrance. Included in the weekly gathering are two men known as "killer buyers." They make a living buying horses for cheap and selling them to the two Texas slaughterhouses.

Those selling horses - someone who no longer needs a riding horse, someone who's closing a farm, someone who needs the money - at the auction often don't realize who is doing the bidding. The regulars here recognize the killer buyers, but those who show up only occasionally have no idea.

Most of the buyers choose not to bid on the thoroughbreds. Because of the way racehorses are trained and broken, bidders often think it's too difficult to retrain racers for life on a farm.

A 7-year-old mare with a shiny brown coat is walked in front of the crowd. Her name is Meadow Bryte, and she was born in Ocala, Fla. The bidding doesn't last long, not like in past sales. Meadow Bryte once was valued, having sold for $375,000 at the 1998 Fasig-Tipton sale.

She went for $82,000 in the 1999 Keeneland Breeding Stock sale - and for $51,000 last November at the same Keeneland sale.

In New Holland, she sells for $450 and is taken to one of two "killer pens," where she joins a half-dozen other horses doomed on this day to death.

Fifty years ago, there were more than 30 equine slaughterhouses operating in the United States. The number dropped to about 15 in the 1980s, to four in 1999 and today to just two.

Bel Tex, a Belgian-owned plant in Fort Worth, and Dallas Crown, a Dutch-owned plant in Kaufman, Texas, are fighting for survival. The decline in processing plants over the years largely is attributed to a movement among American pet-food makers to wean dogs and cats off horsemeat after facing a backlash from concerned pet owners.

The two plants, which combine to employ 140 workers, still seem to be profitable. Every week, killer buyers fill a quota of horses and ship them into Texas by the trailer-load.

The dealers are paid 35 to 50 cents per pound. (Most thoroughbreds stand more than 5 feet tall and weigh about 1,000 pounds.) The horses are slaughtered here and exported overseas for $1.38 a pound. The meat sells in France for $7-$10 per pound.

According to the most recent figures available, about 13,000 metric tons were shipped in 2001, more than $40 million worth. A European organization called the Ethical Association of the Horse maintains that more than 300,000 horses are consumed annually in France. There are more than 1,000 horse butchers there, though most agree that horse consumption has decreased since the mad-cow scare.

Officials for the two horse slaughter plants declined to grant the Orlando Sentinel access to their facilities. But a Dallas attorney, who represents the companies in lawsuits that seek to shut them down, says horse slaughter is not unlike a plant that processes any other type of livestock.

"The only difference is that horses are not raised for the purpose of slaughter," says David Broiles, who has been fighting a state attorney general's ruling for the past two years that seeks to close the plants. "A horse gets to live some type of life first."

The process that awaits condemned horses in Bel Tex and Dallas Crown is not pretty.

A horse is put in a cramped pen that limits its movement. A worker then will lean over the horse and shoot a 4-inch retractable bolt into its head. Horses cannot be killed in the slaughterhouses with lethal injections because the toxic chemicals would poison the meat.

The stunned horse is picked up by a giant claw and moved down an assembly line. It is decapitated and then hung so it can be drained. The horse's beating heart pumps all of the blood out of the body. The horse then moves along the line where it is stripped of its hide and quartered.

The process is approved by the American Veterinarians Association.

"People don't think about where food comes from," Broiles says. "They like to think it just comes out of a box. If you were to walk them through it, they might be shocked. But these plants are stainless steel. They're pretty high quality, and we have inspectors all around, real organized skill workers."

Critics say otherwise, but Broiles says that USDA-licensed inspectors are on-site at all times.

The animals funnel into the New Holland auction by 10 a.m., and five hours later, they'll leave in different directions.

Sellers and buyers at the auction have been cited by the Pennsylvania State Police and the New Holland police for animal abuse and neglect. They've also been cited for allowing horses to be shipped in double-decker trailers, which typically are designed for short-neck livestock.

By 3 p.m., new owners load their purchases onto their trailers. In the back, there is a pile of animals that died during the course of the day: a large sheep, a couple of cows, a couple of pigs. A euthanized horse will be there by day's end.

Back inside, the two killer pens hold about 25 horses apiece. There are some quarterhorses and some Arabians, but also thoroughbreds.

Kelly Young, who lives in nearby Jacobus, Pa., spotted a thoroughbred in one pen.

"I just saw something in his eye," she says later. Young runs Lost and Found Horse Rescue, which specializes in saving horses that are headed to slaughter.

Despite her outspoken contempt for them, Young has a working relationship with some of the killer buyers. She says she's been able to save more than 100 horses and place them in homes that want a pet or a riding horse.

On this day, she purchased Lieing Lary, a 6-year-old gelding, for $500 - a quick $50 profit for the killer buyer. Many buyers first try to sell their doomed purchases to those who might make use of the horse. They can make more money this way.

Young loaded Lieing Lary into her trailer and noticed a treatment ointment on one of his legs.

"He recently raced," she says. "He was hurt."

Young was right. Lieing Lary had raced just three weeks earlier in West Virginia. He hit the guard rail and finished in last place in a $5,000 claiming race.

Lieing Lary, a grandson of Secretariat foaled in Kentucky, had made 43 starts - one victory, five second-place finishes and five third-place finishes - and had career earnings of $50,161. But that guardrail meant he would need months of rehabilitation, time he would be costing money, not earning it. To keep a horse in training, an owner has to pay anywhere from $25 a day to more than $100.

He was sold - still wearing his lightweight racing shoes - his career entirely spent.

"What I think about mostly is how great they were treated at one time and how there was all this hope and aspiration," says Young. "They were treated like superstars until they fail. Suddenly, they're not worth anything. For no good reason, they're treated like a hunk of meat."

Young only can save one horse on this day. Nearly 50 of them will receive no second chance.

Thoroughbreds are pumped out of Ocala, which bills itself as the "Horse Capital of the World." Outside of Kentucky, Ocala produces more racehorses than anywhere in the country.

"Everybody here loves horses," says Hancock, the head of the state's Thoroughbred Breeders' and Owners' Association.

Florida has nearly 300,000 horses, and the horse industry here annually generates product valued at $2.2 billion. With more than 600 farms producing solely thoroughbreds, many more horses are foaled in Florida than can compete at the track. Breeders say they simply can't keep all of the horses around.

"You have to remember there's a commercial side to it," says Eric Hamelback. He's the general manager of Live Oak Stud, the Ocala farm that seven years ago foaled Meadow Bryte, the mare bought at New Holland and sent to slaughter.

He doesn't like to hear about horses going to slaughter but says, "There's no way we can control a horse after it's sold."

Sweeney, the representative from New York, was so horrified with the idea of Europeans eating American horses that he drafted a bill that would outlaw the slaughter. He has nearly 200 co-sponsors and says it could go before the full House by year's end.

During the next two weeks, headlines across the country will trumpet the possibility of a Triple Crown winner. This time of year is the pinnacle of the horse-racing season, when legends are carved from the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness and the Belmont. It's when racing is at its finest and when slaughter for human consumption doesn't seem to exist.

The sport and the industry survive not just because of the champions that are remembered forever, but also because of the losers that are easy to forget.

© 2004, The Orlando Sentinel (Fla.). http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/tallahas ... 783576.htm

linn
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 461
Joined: 25 Dec 2003, 09:58
Location: North America

Illinois horse slaughter bill killed

Postby linn » 10 Jun 2004, 23:23

Illinois horse slaughter bill killed
By Jennifer Wig
Last Updated: 8:52 pm, Monday, May 31st, 2004


SPRINGFIELD — A controversial measure to prevent a DeKalb horse slaughtering plant from reopening has been sliced up in the Illinois House, a bill that would have made it unlawful to slaughter a horse with the knowledge that the horse meat would be used for human consumption.
.
The measure also made it unlawful to possess, sell, buy, give away, hold or accept any horse meat or any horse intended for slaughtering with the intent of using for food.
.
The proposal failed on a 51-60 vote, with five lawmakers abstaining.
.
“Right now in 49 states there are no plants that you can bring a horse to for human consumption,” said Rep. Robert Molaro, D-Chicago, the bill’s sponsor. “All this bill would do is it says you cannot open a plant and slaughter horses for human consumption, even if you send them overseas.”
.
Rep. Jim Sacia, R-Pecatonica, said more than 15,000 horses a year must be disposed of and that he has “never seen anything slap Illinois agriculture in the face more than this bill does.”
.
“We have been told a horse is a companion animal. Those that support this amendment would tell you that other animals are not companion animals,” Sacia said. “I want you to attend the county fair and you walk up to a 10-year-old young lady or a 14-year-old young man leading their steer or their lamb and you tell them that that isn’t a companion animal. But to each and every animal in the agriculture industry, sooner or later it must go to the big Cavel plant in the sky. It has to happen be it a lamb, be it a hog, be it a steer, be it a horse.”
.
Cavel is the corporation that owns the shuttered facility.
.
Legislators also said allowing celebrities such as famed “10” star Bo Derek to sway their opinions was wrong. Derek visited Springfield during Senate discussion of the issue.
.
“I thought we were elected to think for ourselves, not to think about celebrities,” said state Rep. Charles Morrow, D-Chicago. “If this is the way the General Assembly is going to debate legislation, then somebody help us. If you’re more concerned about the lives of a horse than the lives of a human being, then vote for this bill. I’ve got seniors eating cat food. Maybe they ought to eat a horse.”
.
The House also has moved one step farther toward putting the state’s economic muscle behind Southern Illinois efforts to land the Future Gen project.
.
Senate Bill 3188 sailed through on a bipartisan 116-0 vote. The Senate now must agree to changes made in the House before it goes to Gov. Rod Blagojevich.
.
“This is another piece of ammunition for us to use in our effort to get Future Gen,” said Rep. John Bradley, D-Marion. “It expands the definition of new electric generating facilities to include the integrated-gasification, coal-gasification system that would be utilized in the Future Gen project.”
.
The change dovetails with specs in U.S. Department of Energy’s 10-year, $1 billion project that would construct the world’s first coal-based, zero-emission power plant.
.
It is estimated that Southern Illinois has more than enough coal to supply world demand for the next century, and Rep. Bill Black, R-Danville, said legislators should be willing to help each other with jobs.
.
“Whenever we can we need to reach out and help the economic climate of Illinois to help create jobs, to help retain jobs,” he said. “We’re not asking for the taxpayers to spend huge sums of money on this concept. We are asking that we give every possible consideration to new technology in generating electricity.”
.
Jennifer Wig can be contacted at
.
(217) 789-0865 or [email protected].

http://www.qctimes.com/internal.php?sto ... 24,1028933

Gnosty
Forum Administrator
Forum Administrator
Posts: 551
Joined: 25 Nov 2003, 20:20
Location: Ecuador
Contact:

Postby Gnosty » 17 Jun 2004, 10:13

After serving the whims and cruel treatments by mankind, all horses deserve to retire in dignity.

I have two "discarded" training stable horses that I rescued from a bankrupt owner just before they were to be sent to the "glue factory". Woody is 25 year old purebred TB gelding, a dressage champion, and now teaches little children the basics of horsemanship if he's not running around the pasture like a young colt. His first 24 years were spent in a 12x12 stall or in the practice arena as he had never been in a pasture. Now, he is allowed to be a horse and run with the community herd. His kind manner and gentleness with children is worth more than any monetary price. This is retirement with dignity.

The other "throw-away" horse I have is Doc, a 19 year old purebed Arabian gelding. He also spent his entire life in a stall until now. My daughter has ridden him in jumping competitions against much younger horses and he has won every time. The first time he was in our pasture, he spent the entire day rolling in the grass as if he was living out a childhood fantasy. The training stable called him a "problem horse" because he was always so hyper. Now, he's like a puppy dog following us around in the pasture. He's a natural hunter-jumper who enjoys teaching children the thrill of jumping. In fact, if he's not saddled up daily, he gets upset. Once again, Doc is an older horse living out his retirement with dignity.

On the way to us right now is a national champion 20 year old purebred Arabian mare imported from Spain. She wouldn't produce anymore foals, so the owner discarded her as worthless. We will be giving her a place to retire with dignity as well... and she can run with the others in the pasture as she did when she was first foaled 20 years ago.
Only the harmonics of the LifeCross will bring Living Light to humanity - Michael Edward


Return to “Animals”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron