Big Surprise: Big Pharma sells drug secrets to Wall St.

Pharmas, MD's, vaccinations, etc.

Big Surprise: Big Pharma sells drug secrets to Wall St.

Postby linn » 09 Aug 2005, 13:18

Senator seeks probe of drug researcher payments
Mon Aug 8, 2005 5:42 PM ET

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A top Republican senator on Monday urged the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Justice Department to look into a report that Wall Street investors paid researchers to reveal confidential information about ongoing drug studies.

"Selling drug secrets violates a trust that is fundamental to the integrity of both scientific research and our financial markets," Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa said in a letter to SEC Chairman Chris Cox and Attorney General Alberto Gonzales.

The Seattle Times on Sunday said some medical researchers received up to $500 per hour to tell brokerages and hedge funds about the likelihood of a drug's success and marketability.

Large investors can use the information to position themselves to profit from movement in a stock once the trial results become public, the report said.

The newspaper said it had found some 26 cases where doctors "leaked confidential and critical details" of their research to Wall Street players.

"Obviously this is the type of information that would affect the sale of stocks," Grassley told CNBC business television, "I want to know whether laws have been violated."

An SEC spokesman declined to comment on Grassley's letter. A Justice Department representative was not available to comment.

The Times also described "matchmaker firms," set up to make researchers available to investors for an hourly fee.

"If they're the vehicle for the violation of law, it seems to me that they ought to come in for some investigation as well," Grassley said during his CNBC interview.

Gerson Lehrman Group, named in the newspaper story as a matchmaker firm, defended its services in a statement on Monday. It said it allowed investors to avoid "companies that excel in marketing more than medicine."

"Physicians in every specialty have told us how good they feel about providing objective insights into science and technology that would otherwise be too complicated for investors to grasp," the statement said.

Billy Tauzin, president of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, told Reuters that clinical trials must be "a trustworthy process so that folks who work within it are busy trying to get the truth about a drug ... not busy trying to help somebody on Wall Street make money."

Grassley is chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, which oversees payments to the U.S. insurance programs Medicare and Medicaid, and has taken a strong interest in the government's drug approval process.

(Additional reporting by Susan Cornwell, Lisa Richwine and Jeremy Pelofsky)

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linn
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Postby Paulo » 14 Aug 2005, 01:04

Linn, I thought you and the rest would like the following research.

http://www.mnwelldir.org/docs/cancer1/budwig.htm

Stay well,
Paulo
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Postby linn » 14 Aug 2005, 13:42

Thanks Paulo!

I buy bulk flax seed online and grind it myself -- that way you don't have to worry about it going rancid. All my horses and I eat it every day! :grin:

http://stores.ebay.com/Bulk-Flax-Store

Also, there's good old Oxy-C:

http://www.rense.com/products/oxy-c1.htm
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Postby Paulo » 14 Aug 2005, 15:14

Good Linn,
I'm passing on your info to 'horse- friends' of mine. I'm sure they will get a 'kick' out of it :clap:

Be good,
Paulo
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Postby linn » 14 Aug 2005, 22:35

Paulo wrote:Be good

Now, Paulo -- when am I not good? :wink:

BTW, I haven't tried the Oxy-C on horses.

I use a coffee bean grinder to grind my flax seed. Gnosty prefers stone-ground to mechanically-ground flax seed, but I have twice as many horses as he does and the stabilized stone-ground product he uses is far more expensive than the bulk whole seed.

Something I forgot to mention. For meat eaters -- the beef from Belted Galloway cattle contains Omega fatty acids, in addition to having much lower cholesterol than other beef. Belted Galloways are an ancient British breed making a comeback after nearly going extinct in the 1970's. Omega fatty acids have been bred out of modern breeds of cattle.
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Postby Paulo » 15 Aug 2005, 18:31

Hiya Linn,
Flax is good for good humor too I see :grin:

I was introduced to flax by an iriologist in 91. But my only knowledge of its taking was to put a tablespoon or so into a glass of water overnight to awaken and drink. I've tried it also with dried prunes too for taste and cleansing.

I am naive about this vital supplements, but as time passes, I can understand them. Specially back in 2000, when my body was raveged by hives accompanied by fever and sweats. Some inner-thoughts/friends teachings told me to fast, which I did for seven to ten days drinking only distilled water. It worked - no 'medicines.'

Today at 8 am a over a decade-old friend of mine passed away. Butkus von Caredon, was the sweetest and most loving creature I have ever had the gift of sharing time with. I was up all night laying with him on the floor and caresing him until his final farewell. He was truly a spotless lamb. :cry:
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Postby linn » 15 Aug 2005, 22:14

Hey Paulo -

Who was it who said "Laughter is the best medicine"? Of course, that's been common wisdom for eons, but the quacks keep doing their silly expensive research studies to "prove" it's true.

Most of what I've learned about supplements has been from Gnosty and Marijah McCain (of HerbalHealer.com). Before the FDA started giving Dr. McCain a bad time, her website and catalogue were chock full of information, but these days all she's able to do is list the products.

Am so sad to read about your friend's passing. :sad:

I'm currently facing the loss of my old lady Labrador Retriever. Buffy's been my constant and faithful companion for many years -- her 13th birthday will be in October. With an average life span of 10-12 years for Labs, she's beat the odds despite the way the quacks said she'd be dead of cancer within six months -- that was over three years ago. Instead of the chemotherapy they recommended, I used Dr. McCain's treatment plan, and the cancer went into remission! Here's a photo of Buffy from 2002 -- it was taken around the time when the medical quacks said she'd be gone if I didn't subject her to chemo:

http://www.windofheaven.org/buffy01.jpg

Staying with and comforting Butkus von Caredon with your hands and voice until the end was REAL Love. And so, Paulo -- I say BRAVO!!! You did GOOD. :clap:
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Postby Paulo » 16 Aug 2005, 03:41

Linn, great picture of Buffy!

You know, Butkus hadn't gotten one of those shots (vaccines etc.) since after he came to live with me and family over twelve years ago. He was
a boxer from around the Buffalo area, and a good puppy all the way to the end.

I am glad to hear Gnosty knows much of natural healing. No wonder he has the links :clap: I will vist McCain's site soon, thanks. A few months ago my friend Mike Calhoun turned us on to a tree bark powder called PAU D'ARCO, and he says he uses it to lower his risks of cancer on his colon. Come to think of it, I'm going unto their website now and read up on it at:
http://www.pau-d-arco.com

Thank you Linn, and a big hug to Buffy :dance:
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Postby linn » 16 Aug 2005, 09:02

You're very welcome, Paulo! :smile:

Thanks for the link about Pau D'Arco. At this point, Buffy's body is so worn out that I'm focusing on keeping her comfortable. She's got cataracts, is going deaf, has arthritis, bad hips, breathing problems on humid days, etc.
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Postby Paulo » 16 Aug 2005, 18:50

I understand Linn, I bet she likes the massages during her dog bath time :dance:

I think I'm going to work out something with my sister to get my very sad elderly mother a puppy.

Best,
Paulo
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Postby linn » 17 Aug 2005, 09:10

Yup, Buffy adores her massages!!! :grin:

Just a thought, but I've noticed older people often do better with dogs who are past the puppy stage.
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Postby Paulo » 17 Aug 2005, 16:19

True Linn, I've been thinking about the puppy stages and their constant attention and clean-ups :anxious:

And knowing of that, finding a good "therapy" little creature, I think is important also :pray:

I once addopted a golden retriever from a family which young sons failed to live up their their commitment. The one year old retrievers name was Gregory Peck (Peck for short). And at that time already taking care of three dogs, I gave Peck to a backwoods farmer. Peck was kinda wild :wink: , and he had a good time running around full time on large open spaces... specially competing with the authoritative white geese :brows:
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Postby linn » 18 Aug 2005, 00:00

Yup, puppies are SOOOO cute and lots of fun -- but a mature dog who's well trained and likes to nap often works out much better for the elderly.

A friend who's in his early 70's is a musician, and entertains residents at the local nursing homes with his guitar and harmonica. Everybody enjoys listening to him, but they're even happier to play with and hold Falstaff, his 6-yr-old Rat Terrier.
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Postby Paulo » 18 Aug 2005, 16:35

Linn, that makes alot of sense, but my mother doesn't play the harmonica...... just kidding :cool:

It has happened on the past. All of a sudden a stray dog shows up in front of the house and after seeing no tag, or neighbors knocking on doors or signs posted, we adopt. One of the few times that happened, we bathed the dog and brought it inside the house, but later on that night, we heard the toilet flush and then the shower running. Plus we had previously noticed some beers missing from the fridge, plus GET THIS...
a dog custume laying under the kitchen table!! :roll:

All kidding aside, I think it will be good for my sister and I to go visit the local humane society and search around.

Thanks for the advice,
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